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Systemic exposure and urinary excretion of vanadium following perinatal subchronic exposure to vanadyl sulfate and sodium metavanadate via drinking water

Suramya Waidyanatha, Frank X. Weber, James M. Harrington, Dawn M. Fallacara, Keith Levine, Veronica G. Robinson, Barney R. Sparrow, Matthew D. Stout, Reshan Fernando, Michelle J. Hooth, Guanhua Xie, Chamindu Liyanapatirana, Georgia K. Roberts
Toxciology Letters(2022) DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2022.03.004

DOI: https://doi.org/10.22427/NTP-DATA-002-00048-0001-000-5


Publication


Abstract

Vanadium is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Because of the limited data to assess potential adverse human health impact following oral exposure, the Division of the National Toxicity Program is conducting studies in rodents. In support of studies investigating the subchronic toxicity of vanadyl sulfate (V4+) and sodium metavanadate (V5+) following perinatal exposure via drinking water in male and female rats, we have determined the internal exposure and urinary excretion of total vanadium. Water consumption decreased with the increasing exposure concentration following exposure to both compounds. Plasma and urine vanadium concentration for a unit dose of vanadium consumed increased with the exposure concentration suggesting absorption increased as the exposure concentration increased. Females had higher concentrations than males (in plasma only for vanadyl sulfate exposure). For a unit dose of vanadium consumed, animals exposed to sodium metavanadate had up to 3-fold higher vanadium concentration in plasma and urine compared to vanadyl sulfate exposed animals, demonstrating differential absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties between V4+ and V5+ compounds. These data will aid in the interpretation of animal toxicity data of V4+ and V5+ compounds and determine the relevance of animal toxicity findings to human exposures.

Sodium Metavanadate


Study Tables

BSA Files

Vanadyl Sulfate


Study Tables

BSA Files