COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.

Get the latest public health information from CDC and research information from NIH.

U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it's official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you're on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Share This:

Effects of Perfluorinated Chemicals on Thyroid Function, Markers of Ovarian Reserve, and Natural Fertility

Natalie M. Crawford, Suzanne E. Fenton, Mark Strynar, Erin P. Hines, David A. Pritchard, and Anne Z. Steiner.
Reproductive Toxicology (2017) DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2017.01.006 PMID: 28111093


Publication


Abstract

Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) can act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but there has been limited study of their effects on ovarian reserve or fecundability. 99 women, 30-44 years old, without infertility were followed until pregnancy. Initially, serum was evaluated for Antimullerian hormone (AMH), thyroid hormones: thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (fT4), and triiodothyronine (T3), and PFCs: perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS). Bivariate analyses assessed the relationship between thyroid hormones, AMH, and PFCs. Fecundability ratios (FR) were determined for each PFC using a discrete time-varying Cox model and a day-specific probability model. PFC levels were positively correlated with each other (r 0.24-0.90), but there was no correlation with TSH (r 0.02-0.15) or AMH (r -0.01 to -0.15). FR point estimates for each PFC were neither strong nor statistically significant. Although increased exposure to PFCs correlates with thyroid hormone levels, there is no significant association with fecundability or ovarian reserve.

Tables


Table 1. Characteristics of the study population.

Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility: Characteristics of the study population.

Table 2. Geometric means (95% confidence intervals) of serum perfluorochemical concentrations (ng/ml), stratified by parity at study start and pregnancy at study end.

Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility: Geometric means (95% confidence intervals) of serum perfluorochemical concentrations (ng/ml), stratified by parity at study start and pregnancy at study end.

Table 3. Correlation between ovarian reserve, thyroid hormones, and PFCs.

Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility: Correlation between ovarian reserve, thyroid hormones, and PFCsa.

Table 4. Unadjusted and adjusted associations between PFC levels, AMH, and thyroid hormones.

Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility: Unadjusted and adjusted associations between PFC levels, AMH, and thyroid hormonesa.

Table 5. Effects of perfluorinated chemicals.

Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility: Fecundability Ratio (FR) (95% Confidence Intervals) for each PFC.